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A Stone Is Nobody's

Russell Edson

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The Stone is Nobody's
2002-02-18
Added by: Willard Solie
Why do I feel a relationship between this poem and thirty pieces of silver?
2003-07-04
Added by: kate
This poem is worse than sad. It makes me feeling nothing in a most poignant way.
2003-08-03
Added by: jen
i read it and think he has taken away all the fluff that parents and children "should" be feeling, and states a cold truth we will never be ready to understand
2003-12-18
Added by: Katey
This is such a complex, yet simple poem. He states his message with such simple language, yet the idea is so complex. It makes you think. I love that. The best part? Even if it makes no sense on the surface, the way it's written projects a sadness. It is poignant beyond belief, yet it's "centered" on the image of a rock.
I'll try.
2004-05-19
Added by: Jane
Okay, well this is just my amateur comment on this poem. The man, who ambushes the stone, seems to want that stone (captured) in compensation for something. Just a guess. Perhaps for the loss of the mother's love (in this guess, taken literally). For a moment, the stone, oblivious to what has happened or what is happening, represents some kind of unconscious feeling buried somewhere in the mess of the man's mind. His obsession with the stone, in keeping it, in somewhat protecting it but using it at the same time - blinds him, fattens up his pride. It binds him with his pride, with his desperate need for something (love, power) and this way, he is a prisoner. I guess in the end, the mother relates by pointing out how he has, in a way, imprisoned her. And also, she has been watching over him as he has been watching the stone, maybe letting life and the liberty of the world pass her by. It is sad, as others have said... it's desperate, wanting, displeased and frustrating. But that's just me, I like interpreting differently than what was probably imagined. Completely. So completely, I am wrong.
You Must Be Stoned
2004-06-05
Added by: Christopher
The people at plagiarist must have been waiting for the all too obvious header. I can't believe that anyone is taking this guy seriously. He's a bad mix of a Las Vegas Aesop impersonator and Steven Wright. The man caputers the stone and he is caputered. I think he's talking about drug addiction ( ha). How big was the fortune cookie he pulled this from? To be kind, I also read On Eating Mice, and I might read some more. The purist ideas of right and wrong with the moral temprence thing...is ...sad. Sad, not because it's untrue, but because his poetry...is just like the stone: it does nothing.
Hmmm..
2004-08-29
Added by: Shad
Maybe it's not the poem that is bad, but perhaps your reading of it. I think you are missing something somewhere. You are looking for representational meaning (perhaps?) at least that is who you have chossen to discuss it. Russell Edson is not Dylan Thomas, lets not try and make him be so.
2005-02-10
Added by: Ben
oh Chris, dear Chris why do you go on reading Russell when you do not enjoy him ?
2005-06-28
Added by: candice
When one tries to force something or someone to love them, to stay with them forever... they
fail to see that they are the one held captive, for love can never be forced, and will never grow or belong to the captor under such conditions. In holding tightly to someone or something, simply because you can forcibly do so, you lose the very thing you seek.... to own the 'object', to own the captive. Love cannot be forced from a cold, unfeeling object, nor owned by enslaving the outer presence. Love is an internal thing, and only given through choice. It cannot be forced nor owned. It can only be gifted, granted by willingness. A lover can be a willing slave, but an enforced slavery can never yield love nor ownership.... much as respect can never result from fear. Both love and respect are earned, and yielded willingly, as a choice.

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